Happy Monday! I am still obsessing about Taylor Swift’s show on Saturday night – it felt like a dream but I”m glad it was real.

Wordsmith is dedicating this week to the Hebrew language. Here is their small summary abou this vowel-less dialect:

“A language revival is rare in history, but if you are determined anything is possible. The Hebrew language had ceased to be a spoken language and then revived between the 19th & 20th centuries. Today there are some nine million speakers of the language. Hebrew is not your typical language. It has 22 letters, all consonants. No vowels. No capital letters. And it’s written from right to left.

There are many everyday words in the English language that are borrowed from Hebrew, for example, cider, jubilee, and amen. There are also words that have come to English from Hebrew with a stopover in Yiddish, for example, maven, kosher, and schmooze.”

Enjoy these words, and have a great week!

tohubohu (TOH-hoo-BO-hoo)

noun: chaos; confusion

Etymology
From Hebrew tohu wa-bhohu, from tohu (formlessness) and bhohu (emptiness). Earliest documented use: 1619

Usage (from Wordsmith)
“Our problem is tohubohu. Our industry is drowning in it. But somehow, even with all the confusion and disorder, we manage to develop systems.”
Jerrold Grochow; Take a Little Tohubohu Off the Top; Software Magazine (Englewood, Colorado); Nov 1995.

%d bloggers like this: