I hope you’re enjoying your Labor Day – whether you have it off or not. This week brings more eponyms, although a more specific group of them. Here is Wordsmith‘s explanation:

“In honor of Cervantes’s birthday this month (Sep 29) and 400 years of publication of the novel this year (vol 1 in 1605, vol 2 in 1615), this week we’ll see words coined after characters in Don Quixote. These words are derived after the leading man, his sidekick, his associates, his ladylove, and even his horse.”

Enjoy your week – this one brings a scary/happy day for me, and it’s only three days long; I won’t make anything more of it here, though.

quixote (kee-HO-tee, KWIK-suht)

noun: someone who is unrealistic, naïve, chivalrous, idealistic, etc. to an absurd degree

Etymology
After Don Quixote, hero of the eponymous novel by Miguel de Cervantes (1547-1616). Earliest documented use: 1644. The adjectival form is quixotic.

Usage (from Wordsmith)
“Despite what some say, I am not a Quixote, a credulous buffoon rushing and embracing every charlatan.”
Simon Clark; Mammoth Book of Sherlock Holmes Abroad; Running Press; 2015.


Sancho (SAN-cho)

noun: a companion or sidekick, especially one who joins another in an adventure

Etymology
From Sancho Panza, the squire of Don Quixote. Sancho’s common sense contrasts with Don Quixote’s idealism. Earliest documented use: 1870

Usage (from Wordsmith)
“Parry wants Lucas to become his Sancho and join him on the quest for the holy grail.”
Patrick McCormick; The Fisher King; US Catholic (Chicago, Illinois); Nov 2002.


Dulcinea (duhl-SIN-ee-uh)

noun: a ladylove or sweetheart

Etymology
From Dulcinea del Toboso, the mistress of Don Quixote. The name is derived from Spanish dulce (sweet) from Latin dulce (sweet) which also gave us dulcimer (a musical instrument), billet-doux (love letter), and dolce (softly, as in music direction). Earliest documented use: 1748

Usage (from Wordsmith)
“Augusta Holland, though five years George Frederic Watts’ senior, seems to have been his Dulcinea in the 1840s.”
Brian Sewell; Why Oblivion is the Right Fate for Watts; Evening Standard (London, UK); Nov 26, 2004.


 Lothario (lo-THAR-ee-o)

noun: a man who indiscriminately seduces women

Etymology
While the word was popularized after Lothario, a character in the play The Fair Penitent (1703), it first appeared in Don Quixote in which nobleman Anselmo tests his wife’s fidelity by recruiting his friend Lothario to seduce her. Earliest documented use: 1756

Usage (from Wordsmith)
“Chad Everett played an aging lothario who engages in a steamy audition with a young ingenue.”
People; Bozeman Daily Chronicle (Montana); Jul 25, 2012.


 

Today is a somber Friday, and the pouring rain outside only enhances the feeling. I hope you all squeeze your loved ones tightly, and keep those who can’t do the same in your thoughts and well-wishes.

We end the week of Don Quixote eponyms with rosinante, and I hope you’ll come back on Monday for a new category and some new vocab. Enjoy your weekend.

 

Today is a somber Friday, and the pouring rain outside only enhances the feeling. I hope you all squeeze your loved ones tightly, and keep those who can’t do the same in your thoughts and well-wishes.

We end the week of Don Quixote eponyms with rosinante, and I hope you’ll come back on Monday for a new category and some new vocab. Enjoy your weekend.

rosinante (roz-uh-NAN-tee)

noun: an old, worn-out horse

Etymology
From Rocinante, the name of Don Quixote’s horse. Don Quixote took four days to think of a lofty name for his horse, from Spanish rocín (an old horse: nag or hack) + ante (before, in front of). Earliest documented use: 1641

Usage (from Wordsmith)
“But there was still a second nag, a Rosinante nodding with shut eyelids and drooping knees over the manger, and the saddle hung ready on its pin.”
R. Campbell Thompson; A Pilgrim’s Scrip; John Lane; 1915.

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